Energy

US need for foreign oil falls dramatically

US need for foreign oil falls dramatically
 
 
 

Pakistan-Iran gas pipeline defies US

Pakistan-Iran gas pipeline defies US

 

11 March 2013

President Asif Ali Zardari of Pakistan and Iran's Mahmoud Ahmadinejad have inaugurated a controversial gas pipeline linking the two neighbours.

 

The US has warned that the project could incur sanctions connected with Iran's nuclear programme.

The long-delayed pipeline is seen in Pakistan as a way of alleviating the country's chronic energy shortages.

The work on the Iranian side is almost complete. Construction in Pakistan will begin on Monday.

Live television footage showed the two presidents shaking hands with dignitaries as the ceremony got under way at the border.

"There are people who are against the progress of Iran, Pakistan and other countries. They have found an excuse - called the nuclear issue - to exert pressure on Iran and to prevent its progress," President Ahmadinejad said.

Trouble brews for Iran-Pakistan pipeline

Trouble brews for Iran-Pakistan pipeline

by Staff Writers Tehran (UPI) Mar 7, 2013

After years of delays and setbacks, not least bitter U.S. opposition, Pakistan is set to start work on its section of a $7.5 billion pipeline that will pump badly needed natural gas from Iran's Persian Gulf field.

But trouble's brewing in Pakistan's turbulent Balochistan province through which the 485-mile Pakistani part of the 1,200-mile pipeline will pass on its way to Pakistan's energy-short industrial north.

Balochistan, in southwestern Pakistan, long neglected by Islamabad governments, has seen sustained clashes between security forces and tribal separatists over the last decade.

It's also reportedly a base for Iranian Balochis who, with U.S. backing, have been waging an insurgency seeking autonomy from Tehran.

Bulgaria abandons Russia-Greece oil pipeline project

Bulgaria abandons Russia-Greece oil pipeline project

by Staff Writers Sofia (AFP) March 07, 2013

Bulgaria's outgoing parliament confirmed on Thursday a government decision to pull out of the long-stalled Burgas Alexandroupolis oil pipeline project.

A total 115 lawmakers in the 240-seat legislature voted to throw out a 2007 agreement with Russia and Greece for the 280-kilometre (175-mile) pipeline meant to bring Russian oil to Greece via Bulgaria.

Twenty-five lawmakers voted against the move, and one abstained.

The outgoing right-wing government had already suggested abandoning the project in late 2011 due to environmental concerns and doubts about its economic viability, and with its partners still keen on it, Bulgaria has now pulled out unilaterally.

US may face inevitable nuclear power exit

US may face inevitable nuclear power exit

by Staff Writers
Los Angeles, CA (SPX) Mar 05, 2013

In a 2012 report, the Obama administration announced that it was "jumpstarting" the nuclear industry. Because of the industry's long history of permitting problems, cost overruns, and construction delays, financial markets have been wary of backing new nuclear construction for decades.

The supposed "nuclear renaissance" ballyhooed in the first decade of this century never materialized. And then came Fukushima, a disaster that pushed countries around the world to ask: Should nuclear power be part of the energy future?

In the third and final issue in a series focused on nuclear exits, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, published by SAGE, turns its attention to the United States and looks at whether the country's business-as-usual approach may yet lead to a nuclear phase-out for economic reasons.

Nuclear power capacity grew again in 2012: IAEA

Nuclear power capacity grew again in 2012: IAEA

by Staff Writers
Vienna (AFP) March 05, 2013

The world's nuclear power generation capacity grew again in 2012 after a drop in 2011 in the wake of the Fukushima disaster, according to a draft new UN atomic agency report seen by AFP Tuesday.

"The Fukushima Daiichi accident (in Japan in March 2011) is expected to slow or delay the growth of nuclear power, but not reverse it," the International Atomic Energy Agency report said.

At the end of 2012, 437 nuclear power reactors were operating worldwide, two more than in 2011, with three new ones connected to the grid, two back on line after repairs and three permanently shut down, it said.

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