Europe

Erdoğan is right: Turkey should vote on EU membership

Turkey EU membership

BURAK BEKDİL

The birth of the modern state in the Islamic world has brought with it an eternal casus belli: Should the state be based on man-made laws or divine law? That question has been at the heart of decades-long ideological wars in Muslim lands. Turkey is no exception.

The Mundane Origins of Germany's Huge Turkish Population

German Wirtschaftswunder


by Daniel Pipes
In 1961, the German post-war "economic miracle" (Wirtschaftswunder) was in full bloom, with a seemingly insatiable thirst for unskilled workers. After signing government-to-government bilateral agreements with Italy (in 1955), Greece (1960), and Spain (1960), Bonn turned to Ankara and on this day, Oct. 30, in 1961 signed a "Recruitment Agreement between the Federal Republic of Germany and Turkey" (Anwerbeabkommen zwischen der Bundesrepublik Deutschland und der Türkei). Little did either side realize the implications of this seemingly minor accord.

How the Balkans’ «European Dream» Collides with Their Vital Interests

Balkans’ «European Dream»

 PYOTR ISKENDEROV 
How the Balkans’ «European Dream» Collides with Their Vital Interests
It is not often in the tension-ridden European Union that politicians on different sides of the political barricades express solidarity on key issues.


Italy Is the Mother of All Systemic Threats

Italy systemic threat

BY GEORGE FRIEDMAN
Italy has been in a crisis for at least eight months, though mainstream media did not recognize it until July. This crisis has nothing to do with Brexit, although opponents of Brexit will claim it does. Even if Britain had voted to stay in the EU, the Italian crisis would still have been gathering speed.

Taking Trump Seriously About NATO


Project Syndicate, Jacek Rostowski
WARSAW – A Donald Trump presidency would be a catastrophe for NATO and the West. Aside from threatening to withdraw the United States from the North American Free Trade Agreement and to start a trade war with China, Trump praises Russian President Vladimir Putin and suggests that America should not honor its commitment to defend its NATO allies unless they pay more for that protection.

Playing Defense in Europe

Project Syndicate, Mark Leonard
LONDON – The most frightening periods in history have often been interregnums – moments between the death of one king and the rise of the next. Disorder, war, and even disease can flood into the vacuum when, as Antonio Gramsci put it in his Prison Notebooks, “the old is dying and the new cannot be born.” The dislocation and confusion of 2016 do not rival the turmoil of the interwar period, when Gramsci wrote, but they are certainly symptoms of a new interregnum.

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