Global

Energy and Geopolitics Are Now Intertwined

cc Flickr Opendemocracy, modified, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

Geopolitical Monitor, Todd Royal
Assessing morally obtuse, naïve multiculturalism is a quality lacking in the ForeignAffairs.com article by Niko Tsafos titled, “A U.S. Gas War with Russia?” The premise grossly understates Russia’s reaction to the United States’ (US) liquid natural gas (LNG) exports to Europe, and gives the impression Russia will not be overly bothered by this occurring. It has become dangerously fashionable to blame problems on outside factors, instead of CONSIDERING regime type, historical precedence, and basic rules of deterrence.

US Exceptionalism Has No Place in a Multipolar World

US-RussiaFlyby, photo credit: US Navy

Geopolitical Monitor, Robert Shines
With the end of the Cold War twenty-five years ago, many in the U.S have taken the country’s continued global hegemony for granted. However, this state of affairs is increasingly being challenged by both Russia and China, exemplified by their aerial flybys and interceptions of the US military within their respective regions.

UK Trains or Arms Half the Countries on Its List of Human Rights Abusers



 

Michaela Whitton
(ANTIMEDIA) United Kingdom — New research has shown the U.K. is providing military training and support to over half the countries named on its own watchlist of human rights abusers. An investigation by Campaign Against Arms Trade (CAAT) and The Independent has revealed U.K. armed forces have trained security and armed forces personnel from 16 of 30 regimes who are on a Foreign Office (FCO) watch list for use of torture and violence.

Avoiding a War in Space


Geopolitical Weekly , By Omar Lamrani

Space is becoming more congested, contested and competitive. Since the Soviet Union put the first satellite, Sputnik I, into space in 1957, no nation has deliberately destroyed another's satellite in orbit. But there is a growing possibility that battles may soon be waged in space.

How the West (and the Rest) Got Rich

Storefronts along Hudson Street in New York City, circa 1860 to 1900.

By DEIRDRE N. MCCLOSKEY

The Great Enrichment of the past two centuries has one primary source: the liberation of ordinary people to pursue their dreams of economic betterment.
Why are we so rich? An American earns, on average, $130 a day, which puts the U.S. in the highest rank of the league table. China sits at $20 a day (in real, purchasing-power adjusted income) and India at $10, even after their emergence in recent decades from a crippling socialism of $1 a day. After a few more generations of economic betterment, tested in trade, they will be rich, too.

Trump’s Five Questions on US Foreign Policy


By John V. Walsh

Along with his self-congratulatory bombast, Donald Trump has offered a rare critique of Official Washington’s “group think” about foreign policy, including the wisdom of NATO expansion and the value of endless war, notes John V. Walsh.

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