History

Israel 'admits 1988 killing of PLO no.2 Abu Jihad'

 

Israel 'admits 1988 killing of PLO no.2 Abu Jihad'

 

01 Nov. 2012

JERUSALEM — Israel has for the first time admitted assassinating the PLO's former number two, Abu Jihad, in a raid on the movement's Tunis headquarters in 1988, a newspaper reported on Thursday.

Castro's Nuclear Epiphany—and What It Reveals About the Minds of Dictators

Castro's Nuclear Epiphany—and What It Reveals About the Minds of Dictators

Bruce J. Allyn
OCT 27 2012

Exactly 50 years ago today, on "Black Saturday," the climax of the Cuban Missile Crisis, Fidel Castro sent a cable to Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev calling on him to fire nuclear missiles on Washington, D.C., New York, and other American cities with a warhead 60 times more powerful than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima.

CUBAN MISSILE CRISIS BELIEFS ENDURE AFTER 50 YEARS

CUBAN MISSILE CRISIS BELIEFS ENDURE AFTER 50 YEARS

PETER ORSI
13 OCT 2012

 

HAVANA (AP) -- The world stood at the brink of Armageddon for 13 days in October 1962 when President John F. Kennedy drew a symbolic line in the Atlantic and warned of dire consequences if Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev dared to cross it.

Secret Israel-Syria Peace Talks Involved Golan Heights Exit

Secret Israel-Syria Peace Talks Involved Golan Heights Exit

 

New York Times, 12 October 2012

JERUSALEM — For several months in 2010, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel engaged in secret, American-brokered discussions with Syria for a possible peace treaty based on a full Israeli withdrawal from the Golan Heights.

European Union Wins Nobel Peace Prize

'From War to a Continent of Peace'
European Union Wins Nobel Peace Prize

Der Spiegel, 12 October 2012

Many had thought the award would go to human rights activists in Russia this year. But on Friday, the Norwegian Nobel Committee honored the European Union with this year's peace prize for its contribution "to the advancement of peace and reconciliation" in Europe.

Islam's sectarian divide has turned from mistrust to bitter violence

Islam's sectarian divide has turned from mistrust to bitter violence

Nushin Arbabzadah 12 October 2012

In the Kabul of the 1980s, my teacher asked an apparently harmless question: "Which one of you knows how to pray and can demonstrate it to the class?"

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