History

Middle Israel: The seventh day

Settler Refael Morris stands at an observation point overlooking the West Bank village of Duma
As it enters its 50th anniversary year, the Six Day War looms, for better and worse, as the most pivotal moment in the state’s history. ‘You say you want peace,” said Lyndon Johnson to Levi Eshkol, “but actually you just want a piece of this and a piece of that.”

Siege at Edge of Fallen Empires Tests Erdogan's Hold on Turkey

Selcan Hacaoglu 

As President Erdogan consolidates power in Ankara, separatists 1,000 kilometers away test the limits of his reach.
The curfew in this former Roman and Persian imperial outpost was announced the modern way, online, but word quickly spread like it has here for three millennia. By dawn, tens of thousands of people were gone.
For separatist Kurds in Turkey, curfew is code for crackdown. So when one was declared in Nusaybin on the Syrian border in March, most of its 90,000 residents ran with whatever they could carry.

How the West (and the Rest) Got Rich

Storefronts along Hudson Street in New York City, circa 1860 to 1900.

By DEIRDRE N. MCCLOSKEY

The Great Enrichment of the past two centuries has one primary source: the liberation of ordinary people to pursue their dreams of economic betterment.
Why are we so rich? An American earns, on average, $130 a day, which puts the U.S. in the highest rank of the league table. China sits at $20 a day (in real, purchasing-power adjusted income) and India at $10, even after their emergence in recent decades from a crippling socialism of $1 a day. After a few more generations of economic betterment, tested in trade, they will be rich, too.

Iraq, Sykes-Picot and Mr Five Percent

Calouste Gulbenkian, circa 1890s

 

Ibrahim Al-Marashi

May 16 marks the 100-year anniversary of the Sykes-Picot Treaty, a secret agreement between Britain and France during World War I to carve up the domains of the Ottoman Empire upon its defeat.

Borders melt-down: 100 years after the Sykes-Picot Agreement

Map of Middle East

By ALAN BAKER 
A century after the Sykes Picot Agreement, the Middle East has become a political powder keg and the setting for successive armed conflicts.
The "Middle East" with which we are all familiar is commemorating a curious and even sad 100 year anniversary.

"Yes, let us honestly assess Sykes-Picot’s ugly century"

A map illustrating the 1916 Sykes-Picot agreement.

Author: Rami Khouri
We are into the season when you will be flooded with articles and analyses on the 100-year anniversary of the Sykes-Picot agreement that was signed on May 18, 1916. That agreement between Great Britain and France, with Russian acquiescence, defined how they would divide the spoils of the crumbling Ottoman Empire in the East Mediterranean region.

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