Environment

Climate change's costly wild weather consequences

Climate change's costly wild weather consequences

by Staff Writers
Champaign IL (SPX) Feb 22, 2013

Throughout 2012, the United States was battered by severe weather events such as hurricanes and droughts that affected both pocketbooks and livelihoods.

Rapid changes in Arctic ecosystem during 2012 ice minimum

Rapid changes in Arctic ecosystem during 2012 ice minimum

by Staff Writers
Bremerhaven, Germany (SPX) Feb 18, 2013

Algae melozira Arctic (Melosira arctica).
Huge quantities of algae are growing on the underside of sea ice in the Central Arctic: in 2012 the ice algae Melosira arctica was responsible for almost half the primary production in this area.

Asteroid whizzes safely past Earth

Asteroid whizzes safely past Earth

by Staff Writers
Boston (AFP) Feb 15, 2013

A closely tracked asteroid, about 150-feet (45-meters) wide, whizzed safely past Earth on Friday, the same day a much smaller, previously undetected meteor hit Russia, injuring nearly 1,000 people.

Is the ozone layer on the road to recovery

Is the ozone layer on the road to recovery

by Staff Writers
Paris (ESA) Feb 13, 2013

Time-series (1996 to 2012) of total polar ozone mean values over the months of September, October and November as measured by GOME, SCIAMACHY and GOME-2 flown on ERS-2, Envisat and MetOp-A, respectively. Smaller ozone holes are evident during 2002 and 2012. The maps were generated using total ozone columns derived with the GODFIT algorithm (BIRA/IASB, RT Solutions Inc.), which has been consistently applied to the three different satellite instruments. Copyright BIRA/IASB.
Satellites show that the recent ozone hole over Antarctica was the smallest seen in the past decade. Long-term observations also reveal that Earth's ozone has been strengthening following international agreements to protect this vital layer of the atmosphere.

US Disappoints at Doha Climate Talks

US Disappoints at Doha Climate Talks

By Jörg Schindler

5 December 2012

President Obama's comments in the wake of the Hurricane Sandy disaster raised hopes across the world that the US was finally willing to act on climate change. But America's refusal to make concessions at the Doha climate talks shows just how little its position has really budged.

Shortly before the US delegation boarded the plane to Qatar at the end of November for the global climate summit, Jennifer Morgan, a climate expert at the World Resources Institute, offered a bit of unsolicited advice. "I think there will be expectations from countries to hear a new voice from the United States," she said.

Scientists Forecast Dramatic Temperature Increase

Scientists Forecast Dramatic Temperature Increase

By Christoph Seidler in Doha, Qatar

3 December 2012

The planet must not be allowed to warm beyond 2 degrees Celsius, according to the official targets at the Climate Change Conference in Doha. But a new study shows the goal is far from realistic. Current human activity is set to increase the temperature by some 5 degrees, and the consequences will be dire, scientists warn.

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