Strategy

Is there one American voice in DC on Syria?


Murat Yektin
It was The New York Times that questioned the weird U.S. picture in Syria, as if the CIA was supporting the Turkey-backed Free Syria Army (FSA) rebels against the Pentagon-backed Democratic Union Party (PYD) rebels, which Turkey sees as the Syrian branch of the outlawed Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK).

A new role for Russia in the Middle East

Russia's new Middle Eastern role

Middle East
Jun 10, '13
By Spengler

Russia has thrown a monkey wrench into Western plans for Syria by promising to deliver its top-of-the-line S300 surface-to-air missile system to the Bashar al-Assad government. Exactly when the missiles might arrive remains unclear; the last word from Moscow is that the missiles are not yet in place, which means the matter is up for bargaining.

The Geopolitical Significance, Or Lack Thereof, Of Turkey's NATO Radar

The Geopolitical Significance, Or Lack Thereof, Of Turkey's NATO Radar

March 7, 2013 - 12:20pm, by Joshua Kucer

How much military is enough?

How much military is enough?

BY JILL LEPORE
JANUARY 28, 2013
The U.S. once regarded a standing army as a form of tyranny. Now it spends more on defense than all other nations combined. Photograph by Grant Cornett.
Sixty-two legislators sit on the House Armed Services Committee, the largest committee in Congress. Since January, 2011, when Republicans took control of the House, the committee has been chaired by Howard P. McKeon, who goes by Buck.

Putin-Xi meeting underlines Russian weakness faced with China's geoeconomics strategy

jinping-putin-5

Central Asia Caucasus Analyst, Robert Cutler
On June 25, Presidents Vladimir Putin of Russia and Xi Jinping of China met in Beijing, immediately after spending two days together in Tashkent at a summit meeting of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO). The two countries’ industrial cooperation is dominated by the energy sector, where the several dozen agreements that were signed in Beijing confirmed that in bilateral economic and trade relations China is the agenda-maker and Russia is the agenda-taker. This relationship is now extending itself to the geoeconomic competition between the two in Central Asia and East Central Eurasia generally, as well as into Greater South Asia at a slower pace.

American Power in an Age of Disorder

Barry Gewen
Henry Kissinger’s most recent book was called, very simply, World Order. The title may be taken as ironic, for at present, Kissinger said, there is no such thing. “Our age is insistently, at times almost desperately, in pursuit of a concept of world order,” and unless the major powers, the United States and China in particular, but not them alone, manage to reach a new kind of accommodation about their roles on the global stage, “chaos threatens.”

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