International Relations

Interview with Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti 'A Front Line Between North and South'

Interview with Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti
'A Front Line Between North and South'

Der Spiegel

6 August 2012

In a SPIEGEL interview, Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti says Europe is showing traces of a "psychological dissolution" in the debt crisis and that leaders are doing too little to stop it. He also warns that governments cannot allow themselves to become "fully bound" to parliament in determining policies to save the euro.

Egypt to impose 'full control' over Sinai, says president

Egypt to impose 'full control' over Sinai, says president

 

The Guardian

6 August 2012

 

Egypt will impose full control over the Sinai, its new president has pledged, as the Israeli government warned of a deteriorating security situation after gunmen killed around 15 Egyptian border guards and hijacked armoured vehicles to launch an attack across the border in Israel.

Syria crisis: UN General Assembly to vote on resolution

Syria crisis: UN General Assembly to vote on resolution

 

BBC News

3 August 2012

 

The UN General Assembly is due to vote on a resolution that condemns the Security Council for failing to stop the violence in Syria.

The text is not legally binding but is intended to increase pressure on the council to take action.

Draghi can't offer a quick solution

Draghi can't offer a quick solution

Deutsche Welle

2 August 2012

The expectations were enormous ahead of the European Central Bank's monthly meeting. People were talking about "unlimited firepower" and "whatever it takes." But the announcements at the end were disappointing.

Annan Quits Syria Role

Annan Quits Syria Role 

 

Kofi Annan said Thursday he will quit his high-profile role as special envoy to Syria at the end of the month, delivering blistering criticism of world powers' failure to unite to stop the country's…

Kofi Annan resigns as Syria envoy

Kofi Annan resigns as Syria envoy

The Guardian

2 August 2012

International disarray over the bloody crisis in Syria has been starkly underlined when the UN envoy Kofi Annan announced that he was resigning because of the failure of what he said had become a "mission impossible".

The former UN secretary general said it had been a "sacred duty" to take up the position five months ago to try to find a solution to the conflict. But growing militarisation and a lack of unity among world powers had changed the circumstances.

Syndicate content