Politics

What really happened within Turkey’s military

What really happened within Turkey’s military

August 11 2012

One of Turkey’s key political phenomena in the past decade has been the gradual de-fanging of the military, a sinister institution that has toppled four elected governments since 1960. In fact, even until a few years ago, there was widespread expectation, or concern, that Turkey’s powerful generals would not break their tradition and take down a government that they did not like – this time that of the Justice and Development Party (AKP). That obviously did not happen, and the military has rather been reduced to what it should be in any democratic country. Officers, in other words, began obeying elected politicians rather than threatening them.

Which Country Has the Best Government?

Which Country Has the Best Government?

Bernhard Zand

Der Spiegel, 10 August 2012

Western democracies consider themselves to be efficient, farsighted and just -- in other words, prime examples of "good governance." But in recent years, the euro and debt crises, along with wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, have shattered faith in the reliability of western institutions. Disconcerted Europeans are casting a worried eye at newly industrialized nations like China and Brazil. Can the West learn something from countries that for so long sought its advice? In an introduction to a four-part series, SPIEGEL looks at how the world is governed today.

Interview with Dr. Andrew Mango: “Turkey’s Walk from 1923 to 2023: A Critique of the Past and Recent Political Challenges”

Interview with Dr. Andrew Mango: “Turkey’s Walk from 1923 to 2023: A Critique of the Past and Recent Political Challenges”

ResearchTurkey –

August 3, 2012
Interview

Probably, not that many non-Turkish scholars have been read, referred to, admired and criticized by the students of political science and history as well as the not-so-academic followers of politics in Turkey as much and intensely as Dr. Andrew Mango had.

Multiply, Arınç Tells Minorities

Multiply, Arınç Tells Minorities

The Journal of Turkish Weekly,

9 August 2012

Turkey’s recognized minorities should work to bring their birth rate up so that they can increase their population, Deputy Prime Minister Bülent Arınç said Aug. 7 during a fast-breaking iftar meal with non-Muslim representatives in Ankara.

Altruistic Society or Sect? The Shadowy World of the Islamic Gülen Movement

Altruistic Society or Sect?
The Shadowy World of the Islamic Gülen Movement

Der Spiegel, Maximilian Popp,

 

8 August 2012

Millions of Muslims around the world idolize Turkish preacher Fethullah Gülen, who likes to present himself as the Gandhi of Islam. His Gülen movement runs schools in 140 countries and promotes interfaith dialogue. But former members describe it as a sect, and some believe the secretive organization is conspiring to expand its power in Turkey.

No letup in anti-German sentiment in Greece

No letup in anti-German sentiment in Greece

Deutsche Welle,

8 August 2012

During the debt crisis Greeks have been badmouthing the Germans - but the Germans have been equally critical of their EU counterparts. Some Greeks want this situation to change.

German tabloids portray Greeks as bankrupt and tell them to sell off their islands to pay their debts - and Greek cartoonists sketch German chancellor Angela Merkel in a Nazi uniform or as a whip-touting animal tamer at the circus. Negative comments by both Greek and German politicians have also not made rapprochement between the two countries easier.

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