Economy

Erdoğan: Currency speculators trying to bring down Turkish economy

Currency speculators

President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has claimed Turkey’s struggling economy is under attack from foreign exchange speculators, while also praising citizens who have converted their foreign currencies into liras.

Only an upgraded democracy can save the Turkish economy

Turkish economy


Serkan Dermitas
Even his foes admit the talent of President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan as a politician in reaching out to the people and molding public opinion on even controversial issues, an ability that secured him an indisputable leadership since late 2002.

Forget-Italy,-Turkey-Is-The-Main-Course

Main Course: Turkey


by Tyler Durden
While investors are focused on Italy, Bloomberg's Mark Cudmore warns that another Mediterranean country is poised to grab their attention very soon. A currency crisis in Turkey is rapidly deteriorating, setting the stage for dramatic and unscheduled central bank action.

Turkey’s economic crises

Turkey’s economic crises

Nuray Mert
I should be the last person to write on economic matters, since it is neither my profession nor my passion. Nevertheless, none of us need to be experts nowadays to see that the prospects for Turkey’s economy are rather dim.

A Tale of Two Economies: Russia and the US

Economy Russia US

 By Jacob L. Shapiro
Regionalization can reveal much about countries’ economic structure and relative power.
Power is a relative concept. To say that one state is powerful means nothing. Power only derives meaning if it is evaluated in comparison. Two of the states whose powers we constantly re-evaluate are Russia and the United States.

Is globalization’s second wave about to break? MORE

Globalization’s second wave


Laurence Chandy Fellow - Global Economy and Development, Development Assistance and Governance Initiative
Brina Seidel Research Assistant - Global Economy and Development, The Brookings Institution

After two decades defined by growing integration, the global economy appears to be at an inflection point. This judgment has been prompted both by structural changes in the global economy, especially since the Great Recession, and political events over the past year illustrative of a backlash against past integration. Following one such event—the U.K.’s Brexit vote in June—The Economist magazine reported, in a funereal tone, that globalization now seems to be receding, inspiring comparisons with the rise and fall of globalization a century ago.[1]

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