China

Water War: This River Could Sink China-India Relations

By Joel Wuthnow
The Brahmaputra is the next test for Beijing and New Delhi.
On April 18–19, the Chinese and Indian defense ministers will meet in Beijing to discuss border issues. At the top of the agenda will be how to improve stability along the border, where both countries have overlapping sovereignty claims.

The Pap-Angren Railway and Its Geoeconomic Implications for Central Asia

uz-tunnel

Central Asia Caucasus Analyst, Mirzohid Rakhimov
Central Asian nations consider the development of alternative regional transport communications important aspects of their national economic and political strategy, and the republics have become active participants in various international projects to promote economic cooperation with different countries and regions of the world.

Obama's Hollow Peace in the South China Sea

By Daniel Wei Boon Chua

America can't take war off the table.
Territorial disputes in the South China Sea—involving China, Taiwan, Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei and the Philippines—are destabilizing the region. Although not a claimant, the United States has a vested interest in the outcome. The U.S. Seventh Fleet has been operating in the area since the Cold War, and the maritime disputes involve the Philippines, a close American ally.


Western Mistakes, Remade in China


Project Syndicate, Adair Turner
SHANGHAI – The Chinese economy faces an enormously challenging transition. To achieve its goal of joining the world’s high-income countries, the government has rightly urged a “decisive role for the market.” But, while market competition works well in many sectors, banking is different. Indeed, over the last seven years, China’s reliance on bank-based capital allocation has led to the same mistakes that caused the 2008 financial crisis in the advanced economies.

The South China Sea War is Already Over

cc Flickr National Museum of the U.S. Navy, modified, public domain

Geopolitical Monitor, Robert Shines
Tensions in the South China Sea, specifically the Spratly Islands, are set to continue as the U.S. and China continue playing their game of “chicken” with one another. However, these military tensions between the two powers are only symptoms of the fact that China already perceives the U.S. as the chicken in the region.

A bipolar US policy towards China and Syria

BY CHRISTINA LIN
In psychology, bipolar individuals exhibit unusual mood swings and engage in contradictory actions. Unfortunately, nations can manifest the same dysfunctional behavior.This appears to be the case with US policy towards China and Syria.

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