China

China's future leaders face long march to power

China's future leaders face long march to power

Herald Sun, 19 November 2012

EVEN as Xi Jinping was unveiled as China's new leader, clues on who will take over from him a decade down the line in the long-planned Communist succession system were already being revealed.
Analysts say the front runners for 2022 are Hu Chunhua, a literature graduate who cracked down on protestors in Tibet, and Sun Zhengcai, who spent time as an agricultural researcher in the British countryside.

South China Sea clash overshadows ASEAN summit

South China Sea clash overshadows ASEAN summit

Deutsche Welle, 17 November 2012

A major summit between Southeast nations is getting under way. The South China Sea dispute, which affects many countries participating, will require leaders to steer talks through extremely choppy waters.

China's Power Transition: Forces of Liberalization > Conservative Ideology

China's Power Transition: Forces of Liberalization > Conservative Ideology

The Atlantic, 15 November 2012

So far, the consensus on this week's leadership transition in China has been moving within a fairly modest range on the sober-to-cynical spectrum. Here, e.g., via, Quartz's Naomi Rovnick, are some of main takes now trending on the web:

Xi Jinping takes over reins of Chinese Communist Party at time of heightened anxiety

Xi Jinping takes over reins of Chinese Communist Party at time of heightened anxiety

Washinghton Post, 15 November 2012

BEIJING — China on Thursday completed its once-in-a-decade leadership transition, naming, as expected, Xi Jinping, the 59-year-old son of a famed Communist revolutionary general, to the party’s top position, general secretary. He will also take over in March as the country’s president from outgoing leader Hu Jintao.

Meritocracy Versus Democracy

Meritocracy Versus Democracy

By ZHANG WEIWEI, The New York Times, 9 November 2012

THE world’s two largest economies are both revealing their next leaders this month, and this coincidence has been depicted in the Western media as a sharp contrast between an opaque Communist state and a transparent populous democracy.

China’s Leaders Fear a Ping-Pong Counterrevolution

China’s Leaders Fear a Ping-Pong Counterrevolution

Bloomberg, 8 November 2012

If you’re looking for insight into the Chinese Communist Party as it undergoes a once-per-decade leadership transition over the next week, slip into the back seat of a Beijing taxi and try to roll down the windows.

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