Russia

The Russians are Seeping In, the Americans are Pivoting Out, and the Germans are Moving Up: The Future of Europe

 The Russians are Seeping In, the Americans are Pivoting Out, and the Germans are Moving Up: The Future of Europe

Jakub Grygiel
July 2013
The objective of much of US foreign policy toward Europe of the past century was, to use Lord Ismay’s phrase, to keep the Russians out, the Americans in, and the Germans down.[1]

Russia's Military on the March in Asia

 Russia's Military on the March in Asia

Ariel Cohen

July 25, 2013

*Ariel Cohen, Ph.D., is Senior Research Fellow in Russian and Eurasian Studies and International Energy Policy at the Heritage Foundation.

Recently, Russia launched its largest military maneuvers since the collapse of the Soviet Union. The exercise involved redeploying one hundred and sixty thousand soldiers and officers, along with one hundred and thirty aircraft and helicopters of various types, to the Eastern Military District. Seventy ships from the Russian Pacific Fleet also took part, on the heels of a large-scale naval exercise with the People’s Liberation Army Navy.

Russia's military: Heading for Cyprus?

 Russia's military: Heading for Cyprus?

Amanda Paul

21 July 2013

Russia and Cyprus have close ties both economically and politically.

In a recent interview by the Russian news agency ITAR-TASS, Cypriot Parliament SpeakerYiannakis Omirou expressed his gratitude to the Russian government for its solidarity withCyprus over the past five decades, particularly “the support that Russia has been giving withinthe framework of the UN Security Council in the light of threats on the part of Turkey.

Snowden Puts US-Russia Ties On Ice

 Snowden Puts US-Russia Ties On Ice

By Marc Hujer, Christian Neef and Matthias Schepp

15 July 2013

Edward Snowden has asked for the Kremlin's help to avoid arrest by US authorities. The case is a godsend for President Vladimir Putin because it is distracting from domestic Russian problems. But it will worsen the country's already strained ties with America.

Why Putin Resists

 Why Putin Resists

Nikolas K. Gvosdev

 

Regular readers of The National Interest would not be at all surprised by the reaction of Vladimir Putin and the Russian government to the latest requests of the Obama administration—to cease its support of the regime of Bashar al-Assad in Syria (and facilitate Western efforts on behalf of the anti-government forces) and, most recently, to detain the NSA leaker Edward Snowden in the transit area of Sheremetyevo Airport and return him to face charges in the United States.

Russia After Putin: Inherent Leadership Struggles

 Russia After Putin: Inherent Leadership Struggles

Analysis
JUNE 24, 2013

Russia After Putin

"Russia After Putin: Inherent Leadership Struggles is republished with permission of Stratfor."

Russia has undergone a series of fundamental changes over the past year, with more changes on the horizon. Russia's economic model based on energy is being tested, the country's social and demographic make-up is shifting, and its political elites are aging.

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