Russia

Russia, Turkey, and Iran: Cooperation and Competition in Syria

 Meeting in Astana

Author: Brandon Friedman

The meeting between Iran, Turkey, and Russia in Astana, Kazakhstan on January 23-24, in advance of the next round of U.N. sponsored Geneva III meetings,[1] has been characterized as a new anti-West axis meant to marginalize the U.S. in Syria and the region.[2] Yet Moscow’s reset with Ankara is not primarily directed at the West; rather, Russia is trying to reestablish itself as Syria’s ultimate arbiter. 

Trump-Putin safe zones deal ousts Iran from Syria

 Trump-Putin safe zones


DEBKAfile DEBKA Weekly
Syria stands on the threshold of dramatic changes that will directly impact on the strategic and military situation along the Syrian borders with Israel and Jordan, DEBKAfile reports exclusively. They derive from a deal struck this week by US President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin to establish US, Russian and Turkish security zones in Syria. 

Strange bedfellows: The Russian-Turkish-Iranian axis

Russian-Turkish-Iranian axis


By OFRA BENGIO
Russia has fulfilled a long-held dream of reaching the warm water of the Mediterranean and is casting itself as the hegemon in the region.
Sixty years have lapsed since the Baghdad Pact which grouped together Turkey, Iran, Iraq and the West in an alliance against the Soviet Union and the concomitant Communist danger.

Moscow acts to oust Iran from Syria, bombs ISIS

 Moscow Iran Syria ISIS


DEBKAfile Exclusive Report 

Although Vladimir Putin’s spokesman spoke reservedly Saturday, Jan. 21, about Donald Trump’s inauguration as US president the day before – It would be “an illusion” to expect Russian-US ties to be “free of disagreement” – Moscow’s actions in Syria were clearly designed to meet the new US president more than half way.

PERSPECTIVE FOR ‘TURKISH STREAM’ PROJECT

‘TURKISH STREAM’ PROJECT

 POSSIBLE SCENARIOS AND CHALLENGES

Following the cancellation of South Stream, Russia announced its plans to reroute the pipeline to Turkey, instead of Bulgaria. The new pipeline was dubbed “Turkish Stream”, with same capacity of South Stream, but less vulnerable to EU competition law. “Turkish Stream” has also experienced delays due to the crisis in Russia-Turkey relations. 

Superpower and regional power states’ national security strategies

National security strategies


Sayed Ghoneim

During the previous decade, several Arab countries faced big challenges such as severe deterioration in economic conditions, education, health, etc. On the other hand, rates of inflation, unemployment, and corruption increased. The increase of ethnic and sectarian disputes, the gap between the ruling elite and the people, political and security constraints, and interference in the …

Syndicate content