July, 2016 United States

By Leslie H. Gelb
U.S. policy makers have to adjust from the power to command to the power to lead—from mostly coercive power to mostly strategic planning and maneuvering. America simply lacks the relative military and economic power it enjoyed in the twentieth century. Equally critical to understand, most international conflicts and problems now occur within nations more than between nations. Terrorists and civil wars are much more elusive military targets than troops fighting in battalions. Dealing with internal economic and political situations is far more baffling than simply telling governments what to do.

By Umberto Pascali
 "Information Clearing House" - "Kaethon" - In his last public rant (“Toward a Global Realignment,” ), an obviously worn-out and senile Zbigniew Brzezinski successfully shows that old dogs can't learn new tricks.

 US President Barack Obama (R) greets Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan prior to a meeting at the US Chief of Mission’s residence in Paris on December 1, 2015.

Signs of tensions growing between the US and Turkey continue to emerge, prompting some to question whether Ankara has reviewed its geopolitical priorities and made a shift from Washington toward Moscow. Due to its unique geostrategic position, Turkey has long been important to the US as a NATO ally and a "bridge" between the West and the Arab world.

Supporters of Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan gather at Taksim Square in central Istanbul, Turkey, July 16, 2016.  REUTERS/Ammar Awad
Natasha Bertrand

Tension between the US and Turkey has escalated dramatically in the wake of Ankara's far-reaching crackdown on those suspected to have been involved in Friday's failed military coup. In addition to more than 2,000 members of the Turkish armed forces, Ankara has ordered that at least 50 high-level civil servants, 8,000 police officers, and 30 regional governors with alleged ties to the coup plotters be either arrested or fired, according to Reuters.

PHOTO: In this file photo, a Turkish Air Force F-16 fighter jet lands at Incirlik air base in Adana, Turkey, Aug. 11, 2015.

By JUSTIN FISHEL MORGAN WINSOR MICHAEL EDISON HAYDEN
A coalition fighting ISIS has resumed operations at Turkish airbases following a weekend coup attempt in Turkey that led to a temporary lockdown at Incirlik air base. 
"After close coordination with our Turkish allies, they have reopened their airspace to military aircraft," Pentagon Press Secretary Peter Cook told ABC News. "As a result, counter-ISIL coalition air operations at all air bases in Turkey have resumed."

By Alexandra Sander

At the end of June, the Director of National Intelligence (DNI) released a report counting U.S. counterterrorism drone strikes outside areas of active hostilities and resulting combatant and non-combatant deaths. The public release of these figures is part of a greater Obama administration endeavor to increase transparency surrounding drone strikes and further efforts to protect civilians.


Author Pinar Tremblay
When Istanbul Ataturk Airport was attacked by three suicide bombers June 28, Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim appeared on television and said, “Early signs indicate the Islamic State [IS]” was responsible. In the following days, further evidence and arrests by Turkish security forces confirmed a well-planned IS attack. In addition, on June 29, CIA director John Brennan concurred with the Turkish authorities in an interview, also warning there could be similar attacks on American soil.


Project Syndicate, Richard Haas
NEW YORK – Seven years, 12 volumes of evidence, findings, and conclusions, and one executive summary later, the Report of the Iraq Inquiry, more commonly referred to as the Chilcot Report (after its chairman, Sir John Chilcot), is available for one and all to read.


By Patrick Buchanan

"Information Clearing House" - Does Hillary Clinton possess the integrity and honesty to be president of the United States? Or are those quaint and irrelevant considerations in electing a head of state in 21st-century America?

Politics, United States

 Terror in US

By MICHAEL LAITMAN 
The San Bernardino and Orlando massacres are not isolated incidents; they are the beginning of a new, bloody era in America.
This week, America celebrated 240 years of independence. Much has changed in America since the original thirteen states agreed to unite under the premise that all men are created equal, and are endowed with the unalienable rights to “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” Now, it seems, America is about to face a final, lethal blow to these truths, which are apparently no longer self-evident.


By Dan Goure
As NATO prepares for its summit in Warsaw, the leaders of the Alliance’s 28 nations will try to put a good face on what is clearly a deteriorating security situation on the Continent. Government officials, diplomats and military leaders are wringing their hands at Russian President Vladimir Putin’s apparent ability to run rings around the United States and its allies.


KAITLIN LAVINDER
NATO heads of state will meet in Warsaw this Friday and Saturday at a time when the U.S. has been accused by some of pulling back from the world stage in general and from Europe in particular, as the Obama Administration pivoted to the Asia Pacific region and economic interests there.

U.S. Army soldiers in Al Muradia village, Iraq. Flickr/U.S. Army

By Paul R. Pillar
SINCE WORLD WAR II—the largest military effort ever by the United States, and one ending with clear victory—the use of U.S. military force overseas has exhibited two patterns. One is the increasing frequency and duration of the application of force. This trend has become especially noticeable since the turn of the twenty-first century, with the United States fighting its two longest major military campaigns, in Afghanistan and Iraq. Simultaneously, Washington has conducted combat operations in Libya, Syria and elsewhere, all under the indeterminate rubric of “war on terror.” An entire generation of Americans has come of age with its country perpetually at war.

The guided-missile destroyer USS Mason fires its 5-inch light weight gun during a U.S.-China counter piracy exercise. Flickr/U.S. Naval Forces Central Command/U.S. Fifth Fleet

It's not just about the rocks.
Zidny Ilman

Recent skirmishes in the South China Sea between the Indonesian navy and China’s coast guard have reinvigorated public interest towards the region. Some applauded Indonesia’s resolve in defending her rightful maritime territory.

 Chinese navy frigate. Flickr/Charles W. Clark

Washington’s commitment to Tokyo may endanger American security.
Eric Hyer

China’s increasingly truculent behavior in the East and South China Seas has generated apprehension over China’s intentions and deepened U.S. concerns, especially over freedom of navigation, land reclamation and the potential militarization of disputed features by China.

By Josh Rogin

 "Information Clearing House" - "Washington Post"- The Obama administration has proposed a new agreement on Syria to the Russian government that would deepen military cooperation between the two countries against some terrorists in exchange for Russia getting the Assad regime to stop bombing U.S.-supported rebels.

The world sees Americans as violent, greedy and arrogant.

BY TERESA WELSH

48 percent think Americans are violent. Democrats see Americans more negatively than Republicans. The survey polled people in 16 countries. 
A worldwide survey found that majorities of people in the U.K., Canada, Spain and Australia think of Americans as violent, greedy and arrogant.


By Paul Craig Roberts

 "Information Clearing House" - Democracy no longer exists in the West. In the US powerful private interest groups, such as the military-security complex, Wall Street, the Israel Lobby, agribusiness and the extractive industries of energy, timber and mining, have long exercised more control over government than the people. But now even the semblance of democracy has been abandoned.