July, 2016 International Relations

Recep Tayyip Erdoğan and Vladimir Putin. Kremlin.ru

Erdoğan is set to turn to Russia.
Nikolas K. Gvosdev

As we continue to sort through the aftermath of the failed attempt at a military coup against the government of President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, one unexpected (and potentially unwelcome, from a U.S. standpoint) development is that this botched attempt to remove Erdoğan will further the reconciliation process between the Turkish leader and Russian president Vladimir Putin.

 

Author Ali Hashem

As July 15 was coming to an end in Tehran, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif was on the phone with his Turkish counterpart Mevlut Cavusoglu, whose government was under the threat of being overthrown by a military coup. Meanwhile, Ali Shamkhani, the secretary of Iran’s Supreme National Security Council (SNSC), was on another line with security officials in Ankara.

 


Alex Fishman

Analysis: By sending his foreign minister to Israel, Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi was showing the world that Egypt means business, that it truly is the strongest player in the region, and that no one, especially not the US, should ignore it.

President of Armenia Serzh Sargsyan, President of Belarus Alexander Lukashenko, President of Kazakhstan Nursultan Nazarbayev, President of Russia Vladimir Putin and President of Kyrgyzstan Almazbek Atambayev​. Kremlin.ru

By Nikolay Pakhomov
Seeing Eurasia as a whole has been to Moscow’s benefit.
The political earthquake of the Brexit referendum has already changed international relations in many ways. While the majority of experts in the United States dwelled on the parallels between the anger of British and American voters and the possible negative consequences for the global economy, only a few considered the referendum’s implications for American foreign policy, naming, as an example, a possible end to the American “pivot” towards Asia.

BURAK BEKDİL

The anecdote, mentioned previously in this column, dates back to more than half a century ago, but it explains some of Turkey’s policy failures today. When, in the late 1950s, Kemal Nejat Kavur was serving as the Turkish ambassador to Moscow, Andrei Gromyko, the then Soviet Commissar for Foreign Affairs, asked him: “Your Excellency, your country has the highest number of men under arms in Europe. If you turned them against your traditional enemies, the Greeks, they would be too much for them. But if you turned them against us, it would be too small. What’s the reason for this?”


Project Syndicate, Brahma Chellaney
BERLIN – China has been trying to bully its way to dominance in Asia for years. And it seems that not even an international tribunal in The Hague is going to stand in its way.
China has rebuffed the landmark ruling by the Permanent Court of Arbitration, which knocked the bottom out of expansive Chinese territorial claims in the South China Sea and held that some of the country’s practices were in violation of international law. Recognizing that there is no mechanism to enforce the PCA’s ruling, China does not intend to give even an inch on its claims to everything that falls within its unilaterally drawn “nine-dash line.”


by Abha Shankar, IPT News

Turkey is mending fences with Egypt and cutting back its support for the Muslim Brotherhood in response to the deadly terror attacks that have struck the country over the past year, The London Times reports.


NURAY MERT, hurriyetdailynews
Turkey seems to be changing its foreign policy with new deals with Israel and Russia – two arch enemies until recently. Nevertheless, it would be very misleading to assume that this change is a sign of “moderation.” First of all, these are not deals between moderate, peaceful and democratic countries; Turkey, Russia and Israel have authoritarian regimes and governments which will hardly encourage each other to engage in moderate politics.

BURAK BEKDİL, hurriyetdailynews
“Terrorism is like a boomerang… which will come back and hit you,” President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan warned the countries of the European Union on June 24. “Terrorism is like a boomerang… which will come back and hit you,” President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan warned the countries of the European Union on June 24. “If you [the EU] abet terrorists [and]… give them financial support, you will have worse days.” Five days later, the boomerang came back and struck – not precisely EU soil, but Istanbul. Sadly, in the president’s grossly inconsistent thinking, the terrorists hit Europe because the Europeans abet and financially help them, but when they hit Turkey it is not because Turkey abets and financially helps them.