May, 2016 Culture


Author Mustafa Akyol 

A poll by the Pew Research Center in October highlighted a trend in Turkish society with foreign policy implications: Turks hold deeply unfavorable views of other nations. The most disliked nation proved to be Israel, with only 2% of Turks expressing any sympathy for the Jewish state. The United States also turned out to be highly unpopular, with only 19% of polled Turks expressing sympathy. Similarly unpopular were the European Union, China, Brazil and Russia.

Muslims pray as they take part in a protest against presidential candidate Donald Trump outside his office in New York [Reuters]
Khaled A Beydoun
After winning four pivotal presidential primaries on April 26, Hillary Clinton drew a line between "hard working, terror-hating Muslims" and (Muslim) terrorists. In front of a raucous audience of supporters in Philadelphia, Clinton - the presumptive presidential candidate for the Democratic Party - only made mention of Muslims in relation to terrorism, and reaffirmed the mythic "good versus bad" Muslim paradigm.


By Ted Galen Carpenter

"Information Clearing House" - "National Interest" - In his 1961 farewell address, President Dwight D. Eisenhower warned of the growing influence of the “military-industrial complex” on American politics and policy. Interestingly, Eisenhower’s original formulation of the menace was the even more accurate “military-industrial-congressional complex.” (Emphasis added). Seeing how that network of special interests has worked its tentacles into so many aspects of American political and economic life in the intervening decades indicates just how prescient was Eisenhower’s warning.

Diyanet

HILMI DEMIR AND SELIM KORUMAY 
The Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) recently declared Mehmet Görmez, the head of Turkey’s Presidency of Religious Affairs – the “Diyanet” as it is often referred to – an apostate. The Diyanet is in charge of Turkey’s nation-wide network of mosques, making this an attack on mainstream Sunni Islam in Turkey.


by Caleb Jephson, American Thinker
Dictatorships have an interest in magnifying minor problems in liberal democracies in order to divert attention from their own oppression and brutality. One wonders if this interest played a role in facilitating a recent panel titled "Anti-Muslim Sentiment in the US: Challenges and Perspectives." The panel was sponsored by Harvard University's Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program (AISP), whose eponymous founder is an influential member of the Wahhabi Saudi regime. As every panelist was either a current or future Harvard alumnus, the event provided evidence of some disturbing trends in elite higher education today.