February, 2016 terrorism


by Raymond Ibrahim, Strategika

ISIS propaganda trumpets Muslim strength, not grievances.
The best way to understand the Islamic State (ISIS) is to see it as the next phase of al-Qaeda. All Sunni Islamic jihadi groups—Boko Haram, ISIS, Taliban, al-Shabaab, al-Qaeda, even Hamas—share the same motivations based on a literal and orthodox reading of Islamic history and doctrine: resurrecting a caliphate (which existed in various forms from 632 to 1924) that implements and spreads the totality of sharia, or Islamic law.

By Tobias von Lossow for SWP

According to Tobias von Losso, the so-called Islamic State (IS) has been exploiting its control of water resources to further its political and military aims, both in Syria and Iraq. The tactic does raise a conundrum, however. Yes, IS wants to inflict pain on its enemies, but it also needs to maintain needed services in the areas it controls.


CAMILLE MULCAIRE
The political ideologisation of Islam refers to the interpretation of Islam as a ‘political ideology’: a comprehensive ‘system of ideas for social and political action’ (Safire, 2008: 336) which serve as a functional tool for the ordering of state and society, whilst also outlining how this ideal socio-political order might be attained (Erikson and Tedin, 2003: 64).

By U.S. Department of State from United States - Secretary Kerry Sits With Saudi King Salman Before Bilateral Meeting in Riyadh, Public Domain, $3

Lincoln Clapper, Geopolitical Monitor
The rise of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) has become somewhat of a revelation to the international community over the last several months. Commencing with the desertion from Al-Qaeda, to the self-proclamation of Caliph by its leader Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi, and finally the surge in Iraq and Syria, each move has occurred without a countervailing effort.